Woodworking questions (for New and Old alike)

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It was mentioned a little while ago about having a forum for Woodworking Questions. Wither you are new to the craft or have been at it for some time now if you are stumped ask your question. The questions can be anything; from tool setup, how to complete a task, the best way to accomplish a task, how to choose a finish, the possibilities are only limited by your imagination.

There are a large number of members here who are willing to help the fellow woodworker out, and they have an overabundance of knowledge that one can tap into. You will probably get quite a few responses, as we all have different views or have built different things, but the help is there for the asking.

This is one of the reasons that I personally follow members on the site, they can be very helpful with the ideas that they put on here. And we even share plans or borrow projects, if they are really striking and we feel the need to make something to resemble their project. 

One can find a lot of information in the blogs that are posted here also. The blogs that the members write are usually done in a series and show the process of how they arrived at the final project. A good example is the ones dealing with the model cars, some of the processes are very detailed. 

But the objective of this forum is for folks to ask the questions that will help them achieve what they are trying to accomplish and have a great finished project to post here. So, Ask Away.

Main Street to the Mountains

55 Replies

thank you eric for starting this forum. i forget who suggested it because i said, great idea ! maybe forums like this will bring in more new members that are feeling intimidated that they wont fit in here. please let me assure you, we have great people that will share what they have and welcome you to the craftisian family. so jump in with whatever you need help with and you will get the help you need !

working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

I don't remember who mentioned it either, but here it is.  

Main Street to the Mountains

let me just say to those that are looking but feel you wont fit in, dont, i assure you we are looking for people that are just starting out and need help. hey were a bunch of old farts that would love to pass on our knowledge. so help us help you !!!! and let me say, you wont find a better wood forum period !!!!!

working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

Don't let the old farts scare you. We are a great group with the knowledge to share for the taking. And you will make friends here along the way.

Main Street to the Mountains

 Very true, and a great bunch of folks here…!

Ryan/// ~sigh~ I blew up another bowl. Moke told me "I made the inside bigger than the outside".

hey "were" not that scary, are we 🤣🤣🤣

working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

i will be the first to ask : how do i stabilize pen blanks with out pump, pot, cactus  juice and another 300.00 to buy these items ? ? ? 🙄

*TONY ** Reinholds* ALWAYS REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN

The first member I can think of is Dave P, he may have the answer for that question.

Main Street to the Mountains

Tony, you probably can’t completely, but you can do a decent job by turning slowly, and if you come across a crack, or tear-out, or any sign of the wood starting to come apart, hit it with thin CA, wait for it to soak in, then zap it with accelerator before you start turning again. If you’ve got a hole or crack, push some sawdust from the turning into it before putting on the thin CA. It may take multiple layers to fill the void before you can move on, but if you do fill the void, you’ll likely be able to proceed without blowing up the piece.

If you do blow up the piece, glue it back together with wood glue, let it dry overnight, fill any remaining cracks with CA and sawdust, zap with accelerator, and on you go. It’s slow, but if you’re patient, you can rescue blanks that were in multiple pieces, as long as you can find enough to piece it together.

You can also stabilize very punky wood by drying it thoroughly (toaster oven, 220 degrees, overnight), then simply immersing it in cactus juice and waiting for it to quit bubbling, then wrapping the wood in tin foil, and baking it to set the resin (190-200F, again overnight if you want to be sure). It won’t guarantee penetration as good as using a vacuum chamber, but it’ll probably do the job. It works better the more punky the wood is.

May you have the day you deserve!

Thanks for starting this forum Eric.    Even some of old codgers have questions now and then.    I have clicked the "start following replies" icon.   Be happy to ask of I can answer others questions.   

Ron

Dave - interesting about the toaster over use.

Ron - I probably have questions too.

Main Street to the Mountains

thanks Dave i will try one and see what happens its not punky its just very old 

*TONY ** Reinholds* ALWAYS REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN

Tony, if the wood is old, it may also be harder than you think. Know this from past experience trying to wood from others projects that has sat a bit.

Main Street to the Mountains

I am not a fan of Cactus Juice....mostly because of the owner of the company.  

Mike

I am not a fan of Cactus Juice....mostly because of the owner of the company. 

Oh yeah? What’s the deal there? I’ve never used the stuff but I hear it’s the bee’s knees. 

Ryan/// ~sigh~ I blew up another bowl. Moke told me "I made the inside bigger than the outside".

I have never dealt with a business with poorer business practices....slow to ship, doesn't answer emails, ignores other requests.  I did hear the inventor sold the business, but I never checked.  Just my experience.  He was one of the original mods on the IAP, a long time ago.  Wouldn't answer emails there either.

Mike

I would like to glue down some verneer.  It is quite wavy.  (old)  I don't have a vacuum bag,  in the past I have just added lots TB2 or 3 and weight it, pretty thoroughly.  Being as this is so wavy (I believe it is walnut of some sort, at least its walnut color, only highly figured,)  would it be prudent to make it damp?  Some one told me that and I am very hestitant. 
TIA

Mike

I would think that if one did not have a vacuum press they could roll the veneer with a j-roller like for laminates, and then weight it down until dry. But there again I have never worked with it, just my .02

Main Street to the Mountains

ive only done small veneer projects where i just use spray on 3m contact glue. then i use a j roller to get it applied. on veneer ive cut myself, usually about an 1/8-1/4 thick i use titebond with clamps and cauls.

i just noticed an ad for, red flags of breast cancer ! why would you pay to advertise that on a wood forum thats 99% men ?

working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

In my experience you probably need clamps. Try some veneer glue instead, I use "cold press" titebond, bu the pros like Paul swear by hide glue.

There are recipes for veneer flattener out there. You just spray the wood (old windex bottle is what I use) then set it between a pair of flat boards (I use 3/4 melamine) and place paper towels/newspaper on each side of the veneer then the board. Weight it down good and change out the paper a few times during the first few hours as they get damp.
A day or so later it should be much flatter and you need to do the veneering before the stuff decides it wants to become a New Mexico highway again.

I apply the glue with a 4" ink roller to get a good wet surface, just like a layer of latex paint. Some substrates really like to soak it up so you may need to wake a few minutes then apply a little more and spread it out. I like to place a layer or two of paper towels between the cauls to suck up any squeeze through.
I use a vacuum bag, but you can get good PSI on smaller pieces with a few more thicknesses of flat cauls (prevents distortion from the point loads of the clamps) and squeeze it tight, edges and center, with your strong clamps (parallel jaw and "F" style can really put the force into it.

The cold press glue takes about 2 hours to set up before you unclamp. Set the board out so air can get to each side, this lets it dry evenly and avoid warping.

You do need to balance the veneer on both sides at once.