Choozing a sliding compound chop saw

a1jim
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Depending on what kind of woodworking you do you may want a sliding compound chop saw.there are 10" models and 12" models because of their larger cutting capacity I have always used 12" models but if you don’t need the larger cutting capacity 10" may work fine for you,the 10"saws cost less and so does their blades.
As a contractor and woodshop owner I have owned a number of sliding compound saws,the Bosch,Dewalt and Rigid. They all have their pluses and minuses . I presently own a Ridgid 12” and Bosch 12” ,the Ridgid I keep in my shop because out of the group it’s the heaviest. The Ridgid has a little different locking mechanism and as I said it’s very heavy I also find the dust collection bag on the top tends to want to slid off unless you get it set just right.The positive side of the Ridgid is that it’s priced much lower than Dewalt and Bosch in works very well . The Dewalt I used for years in my contracting business and served me well for many years and was the lightest of the 3 sliders I’ve owned. I switched to Bosch about 5 years ago because I liked the front tilt controls and have always liked Bosch tools.the downside is that it’s a pretty heavy saw and has not seemed quite as durable as the DeWalt.
Another Slider to consider is the Hitachi slider, The school where I teach my adult woodworking class has 3 sliders a Bosch,Makita and Hitachi of the three saws the Hitachi has stayed the most accurate and cost the least .I think If I needed a new saw I would probably buy the Hitachi.
What’s your preference?

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

I absolutely love my Mastercraft 10" blade 14" slide. It’s a gift from my kids a few years ago and I have not found or used better. Mastercraft is a brand of Canadian Tire a hardware chain in Canada. This one was made in Canada. It has not loosened in any way as yet and has a laser marking light. I built an extension fence 2’ on either side and added a tape measure to the right along with a stop made from maple and 2 C clamps.

CHRIS, Charlottetown PEI Canada. Anytime you can repurpose, reuse, or recycle, everyone wins!

Thanks for you contribution to the subject Thorreain
Mastercraft is a brand I haven’t heard of in the states,I’m glad it’s given you good service.
It looks like you’ve got a great man cave going on in your shop,very cool.

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

Thanks Jim, yes it is a great place to hang out, or if you wanna come do some woodworking it’s open to anyone that wants.

CHRIS, Charlottetown PEI Canada. Anytime you can repurpose, reuse, or recycle, everyone wins!

Good subject for those thinking of buying a miter saw Jim and helpful info on what brands are good. My first miter saw was a 10" Metabo (German) without a slider. It was very inexpensive, but quite accurate and easy to use, but without a slider it couldn’t cut very wide boards. I gave it to my son in Sweden and it is still going strong after quite a few years. In fact he just told me a couple of days ago that he is getting a lot of use from it for some outdoor projects and he loves it.

My current saw is a Bosch 10" slider. Not a professional model, but it cuts boards with a width of almost 40cm 16" and it was priced right. It is hard to compare with your prices because tools cost about twice as much here as in the U.S. I use it a lot, for almost all of my projects and it performs very well for me. In the photo I have just attached a quick makeshift auxiliary fence in case you are wondering.

Mike, an American living in Norway

I have a 10 inch slider works well I can cut a 12 inch board just have to lift board a little

jim

I have 3… a 7 1/2" Makita (12" cutting capacity) I put a Forrest blade on it and it is the cats meow for finishing work. I have 12" Makita for my general shop use… it’s ok but there are better ones. I also have a 10" Delta for rough job site use (decks, framing etc). The Delta is permanently mounted on a stand. The other two or built into my shop bench (in line with each other) and both have brackets attached to them to quickly mount onto a (different) stand. My last shop had a 12" Hitachi which was a pretty nice saw but I always went to the 7 1/2" for a real decent cut

Angellos

Thanks for the inviteThorreain, wouldn’t that be fun,but I’m guessing we don’t live close enough to make that happen.
Hi Mike
Wow that’s way cool that you can cut 16".That’s not a model they sell in the states,I’m guessing it’s because you use 220 volts. Our tools seem to find their
way to our kids don’t they. How’s you dust collection hood working out?
Hey Jim
10" saws can do a great job too. you know us contractors we always think bigger is better :))
Angellos
Sounds like you have a lot of experience with a lot of different saws too. I’ve always felt $100+for a saw blade was over the top,do you feel the Forrest blade is worth the higher price?

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

yes. It cuts better than my other blades (CMT, Dimar, Festool) and seems to last a long time between sharpenings. Mind you, I just found a new local supplier that swears their blades are equal to the best out there at 2/3 the price… I’ll try them out and see. Generally speaking it seems that you get what you pay for. I bought a couple of cheap blades and well, they cut like cheap blades. Also, way less carbide which meant only 1-2 sharpenings. I only use the Forrest on the 7 1/2" saw which is only used for finishing cuts so that helps it last a long time! lol

I’m really liking my two saw on one bench set up. Rough or big stuff on the 12" beast and then the fine stuff on the mini saw

Angellos

Has anyone used the Festool slider? It looks pretty sweet but it’s a lot of $$

Angellos

I’ve got the Dewalt 12" slider mostly because the price was right. My employer bought it for me as a reward for one million accident free miles. Can’t get much better than free :-D
So far, it seems pretty sweet. I had to square it up when I got it out of the box, but it’s working like a champ since