What woodworking sources did you learn from and are you learning from now?

a1jim
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Hi Gang
I was thinking back when I first started woodworking,back then there was no internet so I gained a lot of my knowledge from magazines and TV shows and of course trial and error.
Back then my favorite magazine was "FineWoodworking " My Favorite TV show was “The New Yankee Work Shop” and much more information was gained by books many written by authors of articles in woodworking magazines.
Now of course I get a lot of information online from great websites like this and it’s very talented members and wonderful videos on “You Tube” and my Favourite is my Membership on Charles Neil"s" Master woodworking online class."

What woodworking sources did you learn from and are you learning from now?

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

I too watched New Yankee Workshop religiously. Today it is Woodsmith, Roughcut Woodworking, this site is Hugh for me, and all the magazines and on line videos. I learn the most by trying and doing. I see and try and copy.

Jamesw

My wood working skills really took off when I subscribed to Woodsmith back in the 80’s. I built a lot of Woodsmith projects over the years. Now I’m getting more from PopWW and a lot of Utube on turning. I usually read something on woodworking nearly every day and I have a ton of books too. Bob Lang is one of my favorite authors although now he is gone from PopWW.

Bondo Gaposis

i learned in high school. Watched New yankee Workshop and other shows like it.
I worked with a friend in his shop for ten years. lots of learning by doing.
i dont copy others i come up with my owe version or just get inspired by other projects.

RJC

James i like the word "religiously"watching Ney Yankee ,OH yeh. Woodsmith does a greet job of simplifying joinery and breaking down a projects into bit size pieces.

Bondo always like your comments ,Woodsmith has great projects and making lots of them has to be a great skill builder.

RC Another Norm fan ,that’s great you got to work in a shop an learn.

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

I learned the basics in woodshop in 1969 – 72 , the rest was trial and error . I now have a life time subscription to Handy man , push a hole set of their hard copy books. I like new Yankey Workshop and Rough cut wood working .

Wheaties

Never had any interest in woodworking nor knew anyone who did until a little over two years ago. When the “bug” bit he took a big bite at age 69. I love it, it is my passion and I so regret not starting sooner. I started with classes at the local Woodcraft store and of course YouTube is a major resource. My scrap pile testifies to the fact I have benefited from trial and error. I think about the things I make and hope maybe two or three generations down the way some of my descendents will treasure them because their GGGD made them. Then again it might be like a beautiful Chess board I saw recently on Craigslist. A lady stated her grandfather make it and she wanted $35 for it. Who knows what will happen to our creations?

Jack

Jack, I think you may have just come up with the next blog question. What do we hope the future generations think of our craftsmanship? Could be quite interesting.

Jamesw

Thanks Jack and James very good points.

woodworking classes, custom furniture maker

Great idea James, thank you.

Jack

I’ve read a lot of books and probably buy 2-3 different woodworking mags every month. This has taught me the basics on everything from sharpening/finishing/layout/design/joinery but the real lifelong challenge is to translate what I see and know in my head about woodworking design and technique into reality. Somehow the design that I start off building never turns out as sleek as I wanted it, and the joints never as flawless as I envision them….

Rob, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario