Ib Kofod-Larsen Style Lounge Chair

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This is a third outdoor chair that I built using scraps of pressure treated SYP decking that were left over from a deck skirting project last year.  The first two chairs were replicas of Hans Wegner's GE-375, and this one is a replica of a Ib Kofod-Larsen chair.  I could find only two websites with photos of this chair (here's one), which does make me question its attribution to Kofod-Larsen.  Regardless, I liked the lines of the chair, and thought that the design would suit the stack of narrow scraps I had available.



The original chair supported the seat and back cushions with a set of parallel Pirelli webbing straps.  For this outdoor chair, I opted for laced paracord.  The full build is chronicled here, but below are a few photos of the chair coming together.   







The biggest challenge was getting the lengths, positions, and angles right for the side assemblies to come together as designed.  There were no right angles at any of the 3 butt joints and 1 miter joint to serve as a reference.  While the angles all work out on the drawings, once the pieces were cut by a flawed human, they required some fine-tuning to get everything to fit together.   Once I had a matching set of side assemblies, the remainder of the build went smoothly.  All around, it was a satisfying project.

30 Comments

beautiful chair ross. you did a great job working only from a photograph. i wish i had a place to put a couple, looks very comfy !

working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

Watched you do some fine work getting the details down on this chair Ross!

I'm mesmerized by the lacing and the grooves for the rope, very well worked out.
I got to say, you sure make cool things.  Unique, and beautiful 

TimV, "The understanding eye sees the maker's fingerprints, they are evident in every detail, leave Fingerprints." James Krenov

Design of the chair is impressive.    Like all of it.     Looks great.

Ron

Nice, Ross! So how’s it sit? Comfy enough that you never want to leave, or just so-so?

May you have the day you deserve!

A great chair Ross, and a wonderful write up in the Blog Serries. A very cool chair.

I'm going to seal that jig design for cutting the angles, I have a wedgie sled but yours looks like it would be better for cutting single angles.

Main Street to the Mountains

L👀KS very comfy GR8 JOB 😍😎👍

*TONY ** Reinholds* ALWAYS REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN


 Pottz
 commented about 20 hours ago
beautiful chair ross. you did a great job working only from a photograph. i wish i had a place to put a couple, looks very comfy !
Thanks, Pottz.  I have a similar problem - I don't have any more room for chairs inside the house, so I have to build them for outside.     😁


 SplinterGroup
 commented about 20 hours ago
Watched you do some fine work getting the details down on this chair Ross!

I'm mesmerized by the lacing and the grooves for the rope, very well worked out.
Thanks, Splinter, I appreciate the kind words.  


 Tim0001
 commented about 14 hours ago
I got to say, you sure make cool things.  Unique, and beautiful 
What a great compliment - thanks, Tim!


 987Ron
 commented about 12 hours ago
Design of the chair is impressive.    Like all of it.     Looks great.
Thanks, Ron.  If only I could lay claim to the the design!  


 Dave Polaschek
 commented about 11 hours ago
Nice, Ross! So how’s it sit? Comfy enough that you never want to leave, or just so-so?
That's the $64,000 question.  I find it comfortable, but my wife does not.  In the end, my daughter claimed it as her personal chair, so that puts it in the successful project category.


 Eric - the "Loft"
 commented about 10 hours ago
A great chair Ross, and a wonderful write up in the Blog Serries. A very cool chair.

I'm going to seal that jig design for cutting the angles, I have a wedgie sled but yours looks like it would be better for cutting single angles.
Thanks, Eric.  Hey, there's no better validation than having someone steal your ideas.    😁


 GR8HUNTER
 commented about 1 hour ago
new
L👀KS very comfy GR8 JOB 😍😎👍
Thanks, Tony.  👍🏼

and great blog coverage.

If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

Thanks, Pottz.  I have a similar problem - I don't have any more room for chairs inside the house, so I have to build them for outside.     😁

Have you thought about trying to sell some of these chairs (locally—I would think that shipping would be cost-prohibitive)? You have all of the handy jigs, and you can obviously route the cording quickly. If you live in an artsy area, I can see people being willing to pay good money for your unique chairs. I think you’d quickly build a reputation as the guy who makes those really cool chairs.
Looks cool and comfy.    The advantage of the angled arm rests are no water rings from setting your drink on it.  
I like this style! And thanks for the blog!

https://dutchypatterns.com/


 LIttleBlackDuck
 commented about 14 hours ago

and great blog coverage.
Thanks, Mr. Duck.


 Ron Stewart
 commented about 14 hours ago 
Have you thought about trying to sell some of these chairs (locally—I would think that shipping would be cost-prohibitive)? You have all of the handy jigs, and you can obviously route the cording quickly. If you live in an artsy area, I can see people being willing to pay good money for your unique chairs. I think you’d quickly build a reputation as the guy who makes those really cool chairs.
Hi Ron.  I have thought about it, but haven't spent the time to do much research on where I could sell locally.  I did reach out to a local furniture store that carries Amish-made products, but they were not interested.  I'm not interested in commissions, but I'm okay selling one-offs.  That'll limit my options.  But I've not abandoned the idea.


 swirt
 commented about 12 hours ago
Looks cool and comfy.    The advantage of the angled arm rests are no water rings from setting your drink on it.  
Thanks, Swirt.  Yeah, this chair would definitely need a companion side table for drinks.  😀


 Dutchy
 commented about 2 hours ago
new
I like this style! And thanks for the blog!
You're quite welcome, Dutchy!
I'm not interested in commissions, but I'm okay selling one-offs.  That'll limit my options.  But I've not abandoned the idea.

I’be joined, and am keeping an eye on artisans.coop, which hopefully turns into an artisan-owned alternative to Etsy. I don’t know if that would be best for selling something as bulky as a chair, but if it works out, it would be a nice market for smaller things, for sure.

May you have the day you deserve!

That is a beautiful chair Ross! The blog was a joy to follow as well.
Dave - I'll check it out.  Yeah, shipping a chair is pretty much out of the question unless it is a knock-down design.

Steve - Thanks, I appreciate it.

 Ross Leidy 
.....
shipping a chair is pretty much out of the question unless it is a knock-down design.

It was that concept that finally convinced me on my Domino decision.  Have you considered it?

If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD


 LIttleBlackDuck
 commented about 12 hours ago 

It was that concept that finally convinced me on my Domino decision.  Have you considered it?

Are you referring to the Domino connectors?  I do have a set of those and did consider using them for a moment for this project.  But, they're not nearly as strong as a glued joint, plus, I didn't want the extra holes in the chair frame that are required for set-screw access.  

 Ross Leidy
 commented about 1 hour ago
new

 LIttleBlackDuck
 commented about 12 hours ago

It was that concept that finally convinced me on my Domino decision.  Have you considered it?

Are you referring to the Domino connectors?

Yes, that's what I was thinking of.  I haven't really put them through their paces except for a few trial joins, so I wasn't sure of their holding strength other than cabinets... and even they were a "what if".

If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

I've not used them much either - just on some stationary cabinetry where they are hidden.  In that application they work just fine.  However, my impression was that when there are racking forces on the joint (like chairs would have) that they allow too much movement.  Again, that's just my impression with limited experience with the connectors.